Why Strategic sovereignty is a bad idea

Spoiler: A lot of people cried wolf at the outbreak of the Corona crisis. Media reports of shortages of medical goods led to demands for increased production inside the EU of such goods. These demands came at the same time as some countries closed their borders and prevented exports of medical goods to other countries.

But these demands have been proven wrong. Most medical goods were produced within the EU, and trade with medical goods increased dramatically during the crisis eliminating the shortages. This and earlier experience from trading with the rest of the world show that decreased globalisation and specialisation will give us fewer resources and make us less resilient when future pandemics occur.

The export restrictions were counterproductive. The correct policies for combatting pandemics are trade-facilitating. Lowering tariffs and reducing the number of Non-Tariff Trade Barriers are obvious policies. In fact, decision makers across the world have realised this and have now introduced trade-facilitating measures for covid-19 goods that cover more trade than the trade-restrictive measures that were initially introduced. The correct policies within the EU is of course to make sure that the functioning of the Single Market is not harmed by trigger-happy politicians.

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What ever happened to Italy, happened in Italy

Spoiler: This post is a follow-up of a previous post and begins with the text and the graph of that post. That post showed that the Euro has had nothing to do with the poor developments of Italian exports. Instead, Italy has structural problems which date back a long time. A symptom of those problems is the low labour productivity and total factor productivity growth rates relative to the other countries who joined the Euro area at the same time as Italy, the EA12 countries.

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Graph of the Day – Did the Euro hurt Italy’s “competitiveness”?

If Matteo Salvini, the right-wing Italian politician, would have its way, Italy should leave the Euro. Why? Because he thinks that the Euro is the root of Italy’s problems. He has argued that if only Italy would not have to follow EU budget rules, Italy could spend its way out of its problems and return to the growth it had before the Global Financial Crisis (GFC).

People believing that the Euro is the problem, claim that it hurts Italy’s “competitiveness”. If that is correct, Italy’s problems began sometime after she joined the Euro area. If this is correct, we should see a negative effect on Italy’s exports after the introduction of the Euro. Let’ s have a look!

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How to turn a country into a corrupt autocracy – the Orbán way.

Spoiler: Hungary have benefitted enormously by joining the EU. Joining the EU meant that Hungarians were guaranteed civil rights that were unthinkable when Hungary was a communist country. The EU membership also meant that living standards increased to levels far higher than before. Hungary has also received more of EU funding than average of the ten countries that joined the EU in 2010. Despite this, Orbán has since he became prime minister, again 2010, set out on a path violating Hungarians’ civil rights, freedom of the press and rule of law. These are steps towards a more autocratic and corrupt society where elites are free to enrich themselves.

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